Dance Like Everyone Is Watching—And Taking a Video

By Kathleen J. Jennings (kjj@wimlaw.com)

It’s holiday party season, so it is time for our annual reminder that what happens at the company holiday does not stay at the company holiday; rather, it may end up in an EEOC Charge or the statement of facts in a lawsuit if you are not careful.

It is easy to forget that the company holiday is an extension of the workplace because people may be all dressed up and partaking of adult beverages. Maybe there is even some music and dancing. Nevertheless, it is important for everyone, and especially your managers and supervisors, to remember that they must conduct themselves professionally at these functions. Any harassment directed at an employee at a company function can be actionable.

And they need to remember this: everyone at the party will have a camera on his or her person. At the first sign of any inappropriate behavior, you can count on at least one partygoer to whip out a smartphone and take a picture or video. Not only will this be embarrassing, it will be evidence. So dance like everyone is watching you—because they are!

Kathleen J. Jennings is a principal in the Atlanta office of Wimberly, Lawson, Steckel, Schneider, & Stine, P.C. She defends employers in employment matters, such as sexual harassment, discrimination, Wage and Hour, OSHA, restrictive covenants, and other employment litigation and provides training and counseling to employers in employment matters. She can be contacted at kjj@wimlaw.com.

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